Category Archives: Places

Night Photography

Every once in a while I like to get out in the evening and take some night shots. I particularly like this shot of a boat on the river near to my home. This was taken on my Nikon D40, a camera I love for it’s simplicity. I often use the D40 when I choose to leave the more expensive kit at home. It’s a highly capable camera despite its entry-level spec.

Needless to say I used a tripod for this shot, with the white balance set to tungsten. I also used a Nikon ML-L3 infrared remote to fire the shutter.

Crosier Place

Earlier in  the week I photographed a show home at a new development of 13 spacious town houses.

This was my first time photographing interiors, something I’ve been interested in getting in to for some time. I had the run of the show home so there was no pressure and I could take my time choosing the best angle and compositions.

The property was ideal material, being large, finished to a high spec, beautifully presented and with lots of light.

I used a tripod for the vast majority of shots and set the ISO to 100 and aperture to f11. In many of the shots I boosted the EV, in some cases by up to 2 stops.

A handful of shots required a bit of a tweak in Photoshop but the vast majority were fine straight out of the camera.

Overall I was very pleased with the results.

Cricket v Motor Racing

Whilst driving through Essex I was lucky enough to capture this interesting image at Hatfield Heath.

The village cricket pitch is unusual in that it has a public highway running through it!

Having stopped to admire the spectacle of this unconventional confrontation of man vs. machine, I was presented with this scene of a rather racy vehicle dodging the cricket balls.

I’m not sure if the onus is on motorists to time their dash across the pitch appropriately. or on the batsmen to pitch the ball skyward to avoid any broken glass or dented bodywork.

Houghton House

Houghton House is a ruined 17th century mansion just north of Ampthill in Bedfordshire.

Photo on Houghton House in Bedfordshire

The house was built in 1615 for Mary Herbert, Dowager Countess of Pembroke, although she died of smallpox just a few years later in 1625.  The property then passed to Thomas Bruce, 1st Earl of Elgin before being acquired in 1738 by John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford. In 1794, his grandson Francis Russell stripped the House of its furnishings and removed the roof. He died seven years later, leaving no heir. The Grade 1 listed building is currently maintained by English Heritage.

Old buildings can make fascinating subjects for the photographer and Houghton House is no exception, with it’s crumbling towers and decayed features. There are lots of shapes and forms that you can use in composition.

Windows and doorways provide useful framing devices.

Continue reading Houghton House

Elstree Aerodrome

Earlier in the week I visited Elstree Aerodrome to take some photos for a flying school. It was a beautiful sunny day with plenty of activity on the runway, including helicopters and a turboprop.

Lots of glass in the cockpit of this 2008 Robin DR400
This beautiful Pilatus PC12 is a frequent visitor to Elstree, seen here departing on runway 26
Propeller blades wrapped up warm for the winter, this Yakolev Yak 52 rests on the south side of the runway

Continue reading Elstree Aerodrome

Hertford Museum

Yesterday I photographed the newly refurbished Hertford Museum. For me, this would involve a couple of areas of photography that I was interested in, specifically interiors and close object photography.

The idea was to produce a series of photos that would show both the museum and it’s exhibits.

Having just spent over £1m, the museum was in pristine condition and looking it’s best following the refurbishment that had taken over a year.

The two objects I enjoyed photographing most were the Victorian dolls’ house and the model of Hertford Castle. I was particularly pleased to be able to get right inside the dolls house and show the extraordinary detail.

Many of the exhibits were either behind glass or in perspex display cabinets. However, with careful positioning of the camera and a polarising filter I was able to eliminate most of the glare and reflections.

A gallery of the photos taken at the museum can be found on my website at stevebeeston.co.uk.